Technical Infrastructure

Make Google's services fast and reliable for billions of users.

Technical Infrastructure

Make Google's services fast and reliable for billions of users. This team, also known as Site Reliability Engineering, combines software development, networking and systems engineering expertise to build and run large scale, massively distributed, fault-tolerant software systems and infrastructure. We hire creative engineers and technology enthusiasts who enjoy being challenged by problems of scale and complexity, with a strong desire to make services better for users.

We routinely solve software and systems issues ranging from distributed change propagation on live serving systems, to designing and deploying intelligent load balancing systems for the largest user-facing services in the world. Our teams come from diverse backgrounds, and we are actively seeking new team members to bring fresh perspective to solving problems, along with the technical and soft skills needed to keep Google’s services growing and reliable.

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