Henry Miller on Writing

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New Directions Publishing, 1964 - 216 pages
2 Reviews
Some of the most rewarding pages in Henry Miller's books concern his self-education as a writer. He tells, as few great writers ever have, how he set his goals, how he discovered the excitement of using words, how the books he read influenced him, and how he learned to draw on his own experience.
 

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One of the great masterpieces of Western Literature, Nexus is the third book in the trilogy titled "The Rosy Crucifixion." Miller was the most spiritual of authors, following in the tradition of confessional writing as old as the West itself and the confessions of Saint Augustine.
Miller's investigation of the soul (in his case, his own) is the most complete such attempt since Dostoevsky, who Miller greatly admired. My purpose, he wrote, is "to portray the whole man, in all his heights and depths." He feared that the Western audience had become inured to the amputation of man and no longer deeply cared. Miller broke open the water of the rebirth of the West. There is no way to overestimate the importance of his work.
 

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It would be helpful if the pages from the
introduction to page 7 were not upside down.

Contents

II
6
III
16
IV
20
V
26
VI
37
VII
42
VIII
47
IX
49
XIX
106
XX
115
XXI
120
XXII
125
XXIII
127
XXIV
132
XXV
136
XXVI
159

X
51
XI
56
XII
66
XIII
81
XIV
83
XV
87
XVI
95
XVII
100
XVIII
103
XXVII
161
XXVIII
168
XXIX
171
XXX
173
XXXI
187
XXXII
201
XXXIII
209
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About the author (1964)

Henry Miller (1891—1980) was one of the most controversial American novelists during his lifetime. His book, The Tropic of Cancer, was banned in the some U.S. states before being overruled by the Supreme Court. New Directions publishes several of his books.

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