Complete Maus

Portada
Pantheon Books, 1997 - 295 páginas
A memoir of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe, and about his son, a cartoonist who tries to come to terms with his father, his story, and history. Cartoon format portrays Jews as mice, Nazis as cats. Using a unique comic-strip-as-graphic-art format, the story of Vladek Spiegelman's passage through the Nazi Holocaust is told in his own words. Acclaimed as a "quiet triumph" and a "brutally moving work of art," the first volume of Art Spiegelman's Maus introduced readers to Vladek Spiegelman. The story succeeds perfectly in shocking us out of any lingering sense of familiarity with the events described, approaching, as it does, the unspeakable through the diminutive. As the New York Times Book Review commented, "[it is] a remarkable feat of documentary detail and novelistic vividness ... an unfolding literary event." This long-awaited sequel, subtitled And Here My Troubles Began, moves us from the barracks of Auschwitz to the bungalows of the Catskills. Genuinely tragic and comic by turns, it attains a complexity of theme and a precision of thought new to comics and rare in any medium. Maus ties together two powerful stories: Vladek's harrowing tale of survival against all odds, delineating the paradox of daily life in the death camps, and the author's account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. Vladek's troubled remarriage, minor arguments between father and son, and life's everyday disappointments are all set against a backdrop of history too large to pacify. At every level this is the ultimate survivor's tale--and that too of the children who somehow survive even the survivors.
 

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Calificaciones de los usuarios

5 estrellas
78
4 estrellas
31
3 estrellas
9
2 estrellas
0
1 estrella
0

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - debs4jc - LibraryThing

The author tells us the story of his fathers experiences as a Jew during World War II - as well as about his own experiences in interviewing his father about his past. He does this in a unique way, by ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - TobinElliott - LibraryThing

Let's get some of this out early. I didn't like the artwork. I found it a touch too simplistic and really, there was no need to use mice and pigs, etc. Second, much of the story was unforgivably ... Leer comentario completo

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Contenido

Sección 1
9
Sección 2
25
Sección 3
34
Sección 4
50
Sección 5
52
Sección 6
63
Sección 7
64
Sección 8
68
Sección 20
175
Sección 21
190
Sección 22
192
Sección 23
193
Sección 24
195
Sección 25
209
Sección 26
211
Sección 27
217

Sección 9
92
Sección 10
102
Sección 11
137
Sección 12
138
Sección 13
142
Sección 14
152
Sección 15
157
Sección 16
159
Sección 17
164
Sección 18
167
Sección 19
172
Sección 28
219
Sección 29
220
Sección 30
225
Sección 31
245
Sección 32
247
Sección 33
270
Sección 34
272
Sección 35
277
Sección 36
282
Sección 37
294
Sección 38
295

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Acerca del autor (1997)

Art Spiegelman is a contributing editor and artist for The New Yorker, and a co-founder / editor of Raw, the acclaimed magazine of avant-garde comics and graphics. His drawings and prints have been exhibited in museums and galleries here and abroad. Honors he has received for Maus include the Pulitzer Prize, a Guggenheim fellowship, and nominations for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He lives in New York City with his wife, Françoise Mouly, and their two children, Nadja and Dashiell.

Información bibliográfica