Women, Feminism, and Social Change in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, 1890-1940

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U of Nebraska Press, 1998 - 480 pages
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Feminists in the Southern Cone countries?Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay?between 1910 and 1930 obliged political leaders to consider gender in labor regulation, civil codes, public health programs, and politics. Feminism thus became a factor in the modernization of theseøgeographically linked but diverse societies in Latin America. Although feminists did not present a unified front in the discussion of divorce, reproductive rights, and public-health schemes to regulate sex and marriage, this work identifies feminism as a trigger for such discussion, which generated public and political debate on gender roles and social change. Asunci¢n Lavrin recounts changes inøgender relations and the role of women in each of the three countries, thereby contributing an enormous amount of new information and incisive analysis to the histories of Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Definitions and Objectives
15
Foundations of Change
53
Puericultura Public Health and Motherhood
97
An Uneasy Relationship
125
Gender Relations under Scrutiny
159
The Pursuit of Legal Equality
193
The Triumph and the Agony
227
Womens Politics and Suffrage in Chile
286
Womens Politics and Suffrage in Uruguay
321
Epilogue
353
Appendixes
363
Notes
367
Bibliography
441
Index
461
Copyright

Womens Politics and Suffrage in Argentina
257

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About the author (1998)

Asunci¢n Lavrin is a professor of history at Arizona State University. She edited Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America (Nebraska 1989) and Latin American Women: Historical Perspectives.

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