The Evolution of Useful Things: How Everyday Artifacts-From Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers-Came to be as They are.

Portada
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 1994 M02 1 - 304 páginas
5 Opiniones
Las opiniones no están verificadas, pero Google revisa que no haya contenido falso y lo quita si lo identifica

   How did the table fork acquire a fourth tine?  What advantage does the Phillips-head screw have over its single-grooved predecessor? Why does the paper clip look the way it does? What makes Scotch tape Scotch?

   In this delightful book Henry, Petroski takes a microscopic look at artifacts that most of us count on but rarely contemplate, including such icons of the everyday as pins, Post-its, and fast-food "clamshell" containers.  At the same time, he offers a convincing new theory of technological innovation as a response to the perceived failures of existing products—suggesting that irritation, and not necessity, is the mother of invention.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

Calificaciones de los usuarios

5 estrellas
1
4 estrellas
2
3 estrellas
0
2 estrellas
1
1 estrella
1

Las opiniones no están verificadas, pero Google revisa que no haya contenido falso y lo quita si lo identifica

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

The blurbs are bad. One says 'delightful' - it certainly is not that. Neither mentions the author's thesis, which is that: Form does not follow function, it follows failure and fortune. I had to read ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - MarthaJeanne - LibraryThing

On some of the issues it would be nice to have an update, but it is rare that a book on technology remains this readable after nearly 20 years. Leer comentario completo

Contenido

How the Fork Got Its Tines
3
Form Follows Failure
22
Inventors as Critics
34
Derechos de autor

Otras 15 secciones no mostradas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (1994)

Henry Petroski is the Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and a professor of history at Duke University. The author of more than a dozen previous books, he lives in Durham, North Carolina, and Arrowsic, Maine.

Información bibliográfica