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" Further, it is salutary for supreme authority, even when its intentions are most pure, to look to the control of public scrutiny. While conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its exposure to general comment. On the... "
The Oriental herald and colonial review [ed. by J.S. Buckingham]. - Página 202
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The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Miscellany, Volumen9

1820
...intentions are most pure, to look to the control of public scrutiny : while conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its...contrary, it acquires incalculable addition of force. That government which has nothing to disguise wields the most powerful instrument that can appertain...
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Sketch of the History and Influence of the Press in British India ...

Leicester Stanhope Earl of Harrington - 1823 - 194 páginas
...intentions are most pure, to look to the controul of public scrutiny ; while, conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its...exposure to general comment On the contrary, it acquires incalcu* Jahle addition offeree. "' That government which has nothing to disguise wields the most powerful...
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The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register for British and Foreign ..., Volumen17

1824
...intentions are most pure, to look to the controul of public scrutiny. While conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its...contrary, it acquires incalculable addition of force. " That government which has nothing to disguise, wields the most powerful instrument that can appertain...
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The Oriental Herald, Volumen1

1824
...intentions are most pore, to look to the control of public scrutiny. While conscions of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its...contrary, it acquires incalculable addition of force. That government which has nothing to disguisr, wields Ac molt powerful instrument that can appertain...
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New Monthly Magazine, Volumen11

Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth - 1824
...intentions are most pure, to look to the control of public scrutiny : while conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its...to general comment ; on the contrary, it acquires an incalculable addition of force. That government which has nothing to disguise, wields the most powerful...
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The Oriental Herald, Volumen2

1824
...the acts of the Supreme Authority there. Lord Hastings had said, " While conscious of rectitude, that Authority can lose nothing of its strength by its exposure to general comment ; on the contrary (he added) it acquires incalculable addition of force." Here, then, that consciousness of rectitude...
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The Oriental Herald, and Journal of General Literature, Volumen2

James Silk Buckingham - 1824
...most pure, to look to the control' of public scrutiny. While conscious of rectitude, that authoriiy can lose nothing of its strength by its exposure to general comment, un the contrary, it acquires incalculable addition of force. That government which has nothing to disguise,...
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The Parliamentary Debates, Volumen11

Great Britain. Parliament - 1825
...intention« are most pure, to look to the control of public scrutiny. While conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its...contrary, it acquires incalculable addition of force. That government which has nothing to disguise, wields the most powerful instrument that can appertain...
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The Westminster Review, Volumen4

1825
...public scrutiny ; while, conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by exposure to general comment ; on the contrary, it acquires incalculable addition of force." This it will be allowed is an excellent text — the illustration is quite as remarkable in its way,...
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The Political History of India, from 1784 to 1823, Volumen2

Sir John Malcolm - 1826
...intentions are most pure, to look to the control of public scrutiny : while conscious of rectitude, that authority can lose nothing of its strength by its exposure to general comment. On the contrary, it requires incalculable addition of force. That government which has nothing to disguise wields the most...
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