The Oriental herald and colonial review [ed. by J.S. Buckingham]., Volumen14

Portada
James Silk Buckingham
1827
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 55 - And they set on for him by himself, and for them by themselves, and for the Egyptians, which did eat with him, by themselves: because the Egyptians might not eat bread with the Hebrews; for that is an abomination unto the Egyptians.
Página 80 - pothecaries, taught the art By doctor's bills to play the doctor's part, Bold in the practice of mistaken rules, Prescribe, apply, and call their masters fools.
Página 29 - He is entrusted with making the treaty of peace; he may yield up the conquest or retain it upon what terms he pleases. These powers no man ever disputed, neither has it hitherto been controverted that the King might change part or the whole of the law or political form of government of a conquered dominion.
Página 433 - That through a determined and persevering, but, at the same time, judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his Majesty's subjects.
Página 56 - And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons.
Página 521 - His brothers, younger brothers, whom he scarce As equals deemed. All passions of all men, The wild and tame, the gentle and severe; All thoughts, all maxims, sacred and profane ; All creeds, all seasons, Time, Eternity; All that was hated, and all that was dear; All that was hoped, all that was feared, by man ; He tossed about, as tempest, withered leaves, Then, smiling, looked upon the wreck he made.
Página 520 - A man of rank, and of capacious soul, Who riches had and fame, beyond desire, An heir of flattery, to titles born, And reputation, and luxurious life : Yet, not content with ancestorial name, Or to be known because his fathers were, He on this height hereditary stood, And, gazing higher, purposed in his heart To take another step.
Página 575 - Is beauty, curtain'd from the sight Of the gross world, illumining One only mansion with her light ! Unseen by man's disturbing eye, — The flower, that blooms beneath the sea Too deep for sunbeams, doth not lie Hid in more chaste obscurity ! So, Hinda, have thy face and mind, Like holy mysteries, lain enshrined.
Página 441 - Mount, sinless spirit, to thy destined rest ! While I, reversed our nature's kindlier doom, Pour forth a father's sorrows on thy tomb.
Página 28 - The laws of a conquered country continue in force until they are altered by the conqueror; the absurd exception as to pagans mentioned in Calvin's case, shows the universality and antiquity of the maxim. For that distinction could not exist before the Christian era; and in all probability arose from the mad enthusiasm of the Crusades.

Información bibliográfica