The Conchologist's Text-book: Embracing the Arrangements of Lamarck and Linnaeus, with a Glossary of Technical Terms

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A. Fullarton, 1835 - 180 páginas
 

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Página 29 - When it is perfectly formed the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace, or string ; next come the legs of the bird hanging out ; and as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth only by the bill ; in short space after it cometh to full maturitie, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers, and groweth to a fowl bigger than a mallard, and lesser than a goose...
Página 29 - ... shells, in shape like those of the Muskle, but sharper pointed, and of a whitish colour, wherein is contained a thing in form like a lace of silke finely woven as it were together, of a whitish colour...
Página 29 - But what our eyes have seen and our hands have touched, we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire, called the Pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by...
Página 29 - There are found in the north parts of Scotland, and the islands adjacent, called Orchades, certain trees whereon do grow certain shells of a white colour, tending to russet, wherein are contained little living creatures; which shells, in time of maturity, do open, and out of them grow those little living things, which, falling into the water, do become fowls, which we call Barnacles...
Página 29 - ... to the shape and form of a bird. When it is perfectly formed the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the...
Página 41 - Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Página 29 - ... we call Barnakles, in the north of England Brant Geese, and in Lancashire tree Geese ; but the other that do fall upon the land, perish and come to nothing : thus much by the writings of others, and also from the mouths of people of those parts, which may very well accord with truth.
Página 30 - Goose : which place aforesaid, and all those parts adjoyning do so much abound therewith, that one of the best is bought for three pence. For the truth hereof, if any doubt, may it please them to repaire vnto me, and I shall satisfie them by the testimonie of good witnesses.
Página 38 - ... hinge : one of the valves often perforated near the base: hinge with a linear, prominent cicatrix, and a lateral tooth placed within, but in the flat valve, on the very margin : two bony rays for the lass of the animal.
Página 29 - But what our eies have seen, and our hands touched, we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire called the Pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by shipwracke, and also the trunks and bodies with the branches of old and rotten trees...

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