Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind

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J. Munroe & Company, 1859 - 490 páginas
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Página 170 - I behold like a Spanish great galleon, and an English man-of-war; Master Coleridge, like the former, was built far higher in learning, solid, but slow in his performances. CVL, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Página 169 - For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy...
Página 204 - Methinks I should know you and know this man; yet I am doubtful: for I am mainly ignorant what place this is, and all the skill I have remembers not these garments; nor I know not where I did lodge last night.
Página 164 - Heavens ! how unlike their Belgic sires of old! Rough, poor, content, ungovernably bold ; War in each breast and freedom on each brow...
Página 373 - There wanted yet the master-work, the end Of all yet done ; a creature, who not prone And brute as other creatures, but endued With sanctity of reason, might erect His stature, and upright with front serene Govern the rest, self-knowing ; and from thence Magnanimous to correspond with heaven ; But grateful to acknowledge whence his good Descends ; thither with heart, and voice, and eyes Directed in devotion, to adore And worship God supreme, who made him chief Of all his works : therefore the Omnipotent...
Página 373 - One in their nature, which are two in ours ! And Reason raise o'er Instinct as you can, In this 'tis God directs, in that 'tis man.
Página 12 - It is evident, that all the sciences have a relation, greater or less, to human nature; and that, however wide any of them may seem to run from it, they still return back by one passage or another.
Página 176 - And when I die, be sure you let me know Great Homer dy'd three thousand years ago. Why did I write? what sin to me unknown Dipt me in Ink, my parents, or my own? As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame, I lisp'd in numbers, for the numbers came. I left no calling for this idle trade, No duty broke, no father disobey'd. The Muse but serv'd to ease some friend, not Wife, To help me thro...
Página 156 - He heard it, but he heeded not ; his eyes Were with his heart, and that was far away : He recked not of the life he lost nor prize, But where his rude hut by the Danube lay ; There were his young barbarians all at play, There was their Dacian mother — he, their sire, Butchered to make a Roman holiday.
Página 170 - Master Jonson (like the former) was built far higher in learning ; solid, but slow in his performances. Shakespeare with the English man-ofwar, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.

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