Miscellanies, in Two Parts: Prose--II. Verse, &c

Portada
J. Munday and son, 1829 - 512 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Moral Philosophy
90
Transmigrations of an Eastern Prince
91
On forming Connexions
96
Popularity
99
Stenography
100
The Carter and the Two Horses
101
Prejudice
102
Hydrostatical Lamp
104
Patience
105
Ibrabim and Adalaide
106
Vegetables an Elaboratory of Air
112
Cruelty to Animals
114
Desultory Thoughts on Education
116
Civility and Politeness
119
Memoirs of Dr Richard Busby
120
Frugality
124
Memoirs of a Cornish Curate
126
History
136
Evasion allied to Falsehood
138
Game of Twenty 199
139
Modesty and Contentment
141
Negro Slavery
148
Suspicion
150
Sonnet
153
Twelve Golden Rules
155
The Dead Blackbird
156
Reading
157
Jehander Prince of Ava
159
Liberty
163
The Fair Show of Wild Beasts
164
Natural History
166
On an Inquisitive Disposition or the Contrast
168
Shadrach the Jew
170
Home
172
Adventures of a Robinson Crusoe
173
Quadrupeds
178
Charades
181
Fable The Racer and the Cart horse
183
Letter from a Father to his Son on his entering at the University
184
Alcanzor and Zayda A Moorish Tale
187
Birds
192
Spectres and Apparitions
195
The Necessity of giving a Right Direction to the Pursuits of Youth
197
On Maternal Affection suggested by an incident in Reading
199
The Hero and the Sage
200
Amphibia
202
Forbearance A Letter
206
Religion is to be revered
208
On Romances
210
Sympathy of Mind
211
The Alarm Bird
213
On the Origin of Language
214
On the English Language
216
Gillyflower and Wormwood A Fable
218
Fishes
220
Charades Part II
224
The Perishing Sheep An Incident
228
Docility of Disposition the basis of successful Education
229
Modern Times contrasted with the past 283
233
Disappointment 297
237
Conceit The Mender of Cracked Earthenware A Tale
238
Squintinda or the Lover of Mischief A Cha racter
241
A Memorial
243
Insects
245
The Disinterested Arab
249
Perverseness Sullen and Gentle contrasted
251
The Oak and the Brier A Fable
253
The danger of Unequal Connexions exemplified in the History of Amelia Harley
254
Give and Take An Anecdote
261
Worms
262
The Magnet
268
Toleration
270
Success not always dependent on Merit
273
Past Recollections
275
The Obstinate Mule A Fable
277
Sound Thunder and Lightuing
279
Electricity
280
The dangerous Consequences of encouraging a Theatrick Taste in Youth The History of Cla rinda Hartley
282
The Winter Evenings Amusement Part I
287
The Winter Evenings Amusement Part II
291
Detraction
294
Moral Maxims and Reflections to be observed
296
Monitory Epistle to a very Young Lady
360
To Nature written in Wychwood Forest
370
Gloucestershire the seat of the Right Honourable
379
To the New Year 1783
381
For the New Year 1784 A Parody
382
To Mr Warton P L
384
To M Wall M D of Oxford
385
To Spring from Huntingfords Monostrophics
386
Written in Sickness
388
The Poet to his Infant Daughter
389
To a Friend who asked why I contemplated writing my Life
390
On hearing Sacred Music
391
On their Majestics Visit at Blenheim 892
394
To Clara aged 18 years
396
XVI Charge to the Naiads on launching a Pleasure Boat on the Lake at Blenheim 597
397
To the Right Honourable Lady Anne Spencer on completing her Fifteenth Year
398
Carloc and Orra in imitation of Ossian
400
Written in the Temple of Peace at Tusmore Oxon the Seat of William Fermor Esq
403
Address to the Deity
405
The Approach of Spring
410
The Roll of Beauty
412
A National Case
418
Advice to Bacchanalians
421
To a Friend
422
Wish at Parting
423
Absence A Pastoral
424
The Triumph of Africa
425
Resignation
426
Winter
427
The lovocation To Mira
428
On seeing Flavia weep
429
To Daphne on her Birthday 490
430
Written in the Beechgrove Wycliwood Forest
431
For a Ladys Watch Paper
432
Written under a Print of thic Prince of Wales now George IV
433
To Cleora on her Marriage
434
Inscription for a Garden Scat
435
Occasional Epilogue to the Tragedy of Douglas
437
Occasional Prologue to the Tragedy of Cleone
438
Occasional Epilogue to the same
440
Occasional Prologue to the Tragedy of the Gamester
441
Occasional Prologue to the Comedy of the Conscious Lovers
443
Occasional Epilogue to the same
444
The Knights or Both Right and Both Wrong A Tale
446
Intended for Recitation at the Anniversary of the Literary Fund Society 1805
449
Retrospection
452
SONGS
453
St Andrews Day in Oxford
454
The Rose To Laura
456
The Mutual Sigh
457
love thee as Life c
458
Thou setting Sun c
459
Come dearest Flora c
460
The Sailors Farewell
461
Before the Morns c
462
Anacreontic Let the Sage c ib X The Evening Walk
463
From a MS Play Has Delia heard c
464
How weak is vain Man c
465
When Damon first c
466
Imitated from Metastasio
467
When love illumes c
468
Moderato
469
From a MS Play To chase the mists c
470
Sweet is the Vernal Matin c
471
Too late From a MS Play
472
The Confession
473
Great and free
474
From a Pupil to his former Tutor
475
To Sensibility
476
To Winter
477
To Contentment
478
To Hope
479
To Night
480
To Charity
481
To Lady Amelia Spencer
482
To Rational Liberty
483
Absence Written at Warwick
484
To a Young Lady on her Birthday Aug 19
485
To Caroline Duchess of Marlborough
486
On converting Park into Tillage
487
Egotisms and Reflections
489

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 283 - Its form decays, and all its odours die ; So woman, born to dignify retreat, Unknown to flourish, and unseen be great, To give domestic life its sweetest charm, With softness polish, and with virtue warm, Fearful of fame, unwilling to be known, Should seek but Heaven's applauses, and her own...
Página 199 - ... over. We are assured by Pliny, who says, that he himself saw the skin, that it was a hundred and twenty feet long, and that it had destroyed many of the army. At last, however, the battering engines were brought out against it ; and these assailing it at a distance, it was soon destroyed. Its spoils were carried to Rome, and the general was decreed an ovation for his success.
Página 272 - The tear forgot as soon as shed, The sunshine of the breast: Theirs buxom health, of rosy hue, Wild wit, invention ever new, And lively cheer, of vigour born, The thoughtless day, the easy night, The spirits pure, the slumbers light That fly th
Página 319 - He seems to have been, at least among us, the author of a species of composition that may be denominated local poetry, of which the fundamental subject is some particular landscape, to be poetically described with the addition of such embellishments as may be supplied by historical retrospection or incidental meditation.
Página 40 - As soon as the tiger perceives the buffalo, he springs upon him ; while his huge opponent stands expecting him, with his horns upon the ground, to catch him upon them, and throw him in the air. If the buffalo succeed in this, and the tiger...
Página 130 - Immediately on this he fhut the door; and befeeching her attention for a few minutes, to an affair which nearly concerned his happinefs, he began to infult her with the moft violent proteftations of love; and fwore that if...
Página 15 - His delicacy would not suffer him to make many trials of such ingratitude. He was ready to sink under his misfortunes. Providence, however, directed him to two brothers, who in consequence of his care in their early youth, and their own diligent exertions in maturer years, had obtained a competence in foreign lands, and were returned to spend it with honour in their own. These, instead of turning their backs on his distress, invited him, in the most cordial manner, to pass the remainder of his days...
Página 128 - The whole amount of his living did not exceed fourfcore pounds a 'year, and confequently little could be allowed for the maintenance of a curate. My Olivia was again pregnant; when I •found that, exclufive of fome...
Página 111 - I am deeply concerned," said he, « to observe any one whom I so tenderly love, fond of cruel sport. Do you think that the poor beetle which you are thus agonizing, is incapable of sensation? And if you are aware that it feels pain as well as you, how can you receive amusement from its torture ? Animals, it is true, were formed for the use of man ; but reason and humanity forbid us to abuse them. Every creature, not immediately noxious to our kind, ought to be cherished, or at least not injured....
Página 201 - ... the ceiling by silken strings; one of these wires rested by one end on the wet napkin on which the fish lay ; the other end was immersed in a basin...

Información bibliográfica