Mirabeau and the French Revolution

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Lippincott, 1908 - 483 páginas
 

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Página 95 - The sage whom two worlds claim as their own, the man for whom the history of science and the history of empires contend with each other, held, without doubt, a high rank in the human race.
Página 251 - Monsieur, tell those who sent you that we are here by the will of the People, and that nothing but the force of bayonets shall send us hence...
Página 38 - ... must be understood whole droves of wild boars, and herds of deer not confined by any wall or pale, but wandering at pleasure over the whole country, to the destruction of crops ; and to the peopling of the galleys by the wretched peasants, who presumed to kill them in order to save that food which was to support their helpless children.
Página 369 - Besides, gentlemen, the constitution is completed; you have only now to declare that the king enjoys the plenitude of the executive power. We are here for the sole purpose of securing to the French nation the right of influencing its legislation, of establishing the principle that taxation shall be consented to by the people, and of securing our liberty. Yes, the constitution is made; and I will oppose every decree calculated to limit the rights of the people over their representatives. The founders...
Página 369 - At this moment all eyes were turned to the Right, and rested on the abbe Maury. " Send those people to the Chatelet," cried the latter, sharply; " or if you do not know them, do not speak of them." " The constitution," continued Chapelier, " can only be made by one assembly. Besides, the former electors no longer exist; the bailiwicks are used in the departments, the orders are no longer separate. The clause respecting the limitation of power is consequently without value; it will therefore be contrary...
Página 93 - His name was familiar to government and people, to kings, courtiers, nobility, clergy, and philosophers, as well as plebeians, to such a degree that there was scarcely a peasant or a citizen, a valet de chambre, coachman or footman, a lady's chambermaid or a scullion in a kitchen, who was not familiar with it, and who did not consider him a friend to human kind.
Página 248 - Mirabeau suddenly breaking silence, said: " Gentlemen, I admit, that what you have just heard might be for the welfare of the country, were it not that the presents of despotism are always dangerous. What is this insulting dictatorship? The pomp of arms, the violation of the national temple, are resorted to — to command you to be happy! Who gives this command? Your mandatary. Who makes these imperious laws for you? Your mandatary; he who should rather receive them from you, gentlemen — from us,...
Página 20 - ... be enforced without great peril to the Government. *** What evil can be imagined greater for a State, than that honorable men, because they have thoughts of their own and cannot act a lie, are sent as culprits into exile! What more baneful than that men, for no guilt or wrong-doing, but for the generous largeness of their mind, should be taken for enemies and led off to death, and that the torture-bed, the terror of the bad, should become, to the signal shame of authority, the finest stage for...
Página 98 - We deplore the outrages which accompany revolutions. But the more violent the outrages, the more assured we feel that a revolution was necessary. The violence of those outrages will always be proportioned to the ferocity and ignorance of the people, and the ferocity and ignorance of the people will be proportioned to the oppression and degradation under which they have been accustomed to live.
Página 38 - Now, an English reader will scarcely understand it without being told, that there were numerous edicts for preserving the game which prohibited weeding and hoeing, lest the young partridges should be disturbed ; steeping seed, lest it should injure the game ; manuring with night soil, lest the flavour of the partridges should be injured by feeding on the corn so produced; mowing hay, &c. before a certain time, so late as to spoil many crops ; and taking away the stubble, which would deprive the birds...

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