Harry Beaufroy, Or, The Pupil of Nature

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Harvey and Darton, 1824 - 194 páginas
 

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Página 136 - Instinct is th' unerring guide, What Pope or Council can they need beside? Reason, however able, cool at best, Cares not for service, or but serves when prest...
Página 174 - Thus then to man the voice of nature spake — " Go, from the creatures thy instructions take : Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field; Thy...
Página 174 - Go, from the creatures thy instructions take: Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield, Learn from the beasts the physic of the field; Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave ; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Página 103 - ... presses the sides of the arteries with greater force than it acts against the coats of the veins. To prevent any danger from this difference of pressure, the arteries are formed of much tougher and stronger materials than the veins. This is one difference between the two ; there is another still more strikingly illustrative of the care of the Great Artificer. As a wound in the arteries, through which the blood passes with such force from the heart, would be more dangerous than a wound in the...
Página 174 - Here subterranean works and cities see ; There towns aerial on the waving tree. Learn each small people's genius, policies, The ant's republic, and the realm of bees ; How those in common all their wealth bestow, And anarchy without confusion know ; And these for ever, though a monarch reign, Their separate cells and properties maintain.
Página 100 - The citizens of a city may use the water or waste it as they please ; but the precious fluid conveyed by the arteries to the ends of the fingers must be returned to the heart ; for on its unceasing circulation our health depends. " In order to effect this purpose, another set of pipes is prepared, called veins, which, joining the extremities of the arteries, receive the blood from them, and carry it back again to the heart.
Página 184 - Say first, of God above, or man below, What can we reason, but from what we know ? Of man, what see we but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer ? Thro' worlds unnumber'd tho' the God be known, "Tis ours to trace him only in our own.
Página 107 - ... in still larger trunks, till the collected blood is at length poured into the heart through one opening. " The engine that works this curious machinery is the heart. The heart is composed of four cavities. Like other muscles, it has the power of contracting ; and when it contracts, the sides of its cavities are squeezed together, so as to force out any fluid the heart may at that moment contain. This purpose being effected, the fibres relax, the heart once more becomes hollow, and as it dilates,...
Página 105 - ... another still more strikingly illustrative of the care of the Great Artificer. As a wound in the arteries, through which the blood passes with such force from the heart, would be more dangerous than a wound in the veins, the arteries are defended, not only by their stronger texture, but by their more sheltered situation. They are deeply buried among the muscles, or they creep along grooves made for them in the bones. The under side of the ribs is sloped and furrowed, to allow these important...
Página 106 - ... especially in the arterial system, there is, in many parts, only a membrane, a skin, a thread.

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