The Secret Life of Things: Animals, Objects, and It-narratives in Eighteenth-century England

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Mark Blackwell
Bucknell University Press, 2007 - 365 páginas
This collection enriches and complicates the history of prose fiction between Richardson and Fielding at mid-century and Austen at the turn of the century by focusing on it-narratives, a once popular form largely forgotten by readers and critics alike. The volume also advances important work on eighteenth-century consumer culture and the theory of things. The essays that comprise The Secret Life of Things thus bring new texts, and new ways of thinking about familiar ones, to our notice. Those essays range from the role of it-narratives in period debates about copyright to their complex relationship with object-riddled sentimental fictions, from anti-semitism in Chrysal to jingoistic imperialism in The Adventures of a Rupee, from the it-narrative as a variety of whore's biography to a consideration of its contributions to an emergent middle-class ideology.
 

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Contenido

Acknowledgments
7
The Spirit of Things
19
The Rape of the Lock as Still Life
43
Personal Effects and Sentimental Fictions
63
Lapdogs Slaves and CounterSensibility
92
Defining a Subgenre
117
Britannias Rule and the ItNarrator
147
The Circulation of Stories
162
Animated Objects and Literary Property
218
Charles Johnstones Chrysal
242
Sex and Death
265
Fictional Point of View and Constructing
292
The Moral Ends of Eighteenth and NineteenthCentury
309
Victorian Diamond Narratives and
329
Contributors
355
Derechos de autor

ItNarratives and Iteration
187

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