Italy and the Grand Tour

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Yale University Press, 2003 M01 1 - 255 páginas
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For members of the social elite in 18th-century England, extended travel for pleasure came to be considered part of an ideal education as well as an important symbol of social status. Italy, and especially Rome - a fashionable, exciting, and comfortable city - became the focus of such early tourists' interest. In this book, historian Jeremy Black recreates the actual tourist experiences of those who travelled to Italy on a Grand Tour. Relying on the private diaries and personal letters of travellers, rather than on the self-conscious accounts of literary travellers who wrote for wider audiences, the book presents an authentic picture of how British tourists experienced Italy, its landscapes, women, food, music, Catholicism, and more. illustrations, the book highlights the discrepancy between the idealised view of the Grand Tour and its reality: what people were meant to do was not necessarily what they did, what the guide books described as splendid was not always so perceived. Black quotes British visitors as they reflect on their trips, and he discusses what their Italian experiences meant to them. And he considers the intriguing effects of tourism on British culture during this most exciting of centuries.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

Italy and the Grand Tour provides the reader with a historical perspective on what it meant to visit Italy throughout the eighteenth century, all the while offering little tidbits of interesting facts ... Leer comentario completo

Italy and the grand tour

Crítica de los usuarios  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In the early 18th century, most British tourists to Italy were elite males and members of the royal family. Known as jolly joys and bearleaders, these travelers made Italy, and Rome in particular ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

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II
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33
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46
VIII
68
XIII
118
XIV
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XV
166
XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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225

IX
75
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XI
94
XII
104

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Acerca del autor (2003)

Jeremy Black is professor of history at the University of Exeter.

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