Sketches of art, literature, and character [orig. publ. as Visits and sketches at home and abroad].

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Página 64 - And yet on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book: who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book kills reason itself, kills the image of God as it were in the eye. Many a man lives a burden to the earth; but a good book is the precious life-blood of a master-spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
Página 418 - I meant to make her fair, and free, and wise, Of greatest blood, and yet more good than great ; I meant the day-star should not brighter rise, Nor lend like influence from his lucent seat. I meant she should be courteous, facile, sweet, Hating that solemn vice of greatness, pride ; I meant each softest virtue there should meet, Fit in that softer bosom to reside. Only a learned, and a manly soul I purposed her : that should, with even powers, The rock, the spindle, and the shears control Of Destiny,...
Página 426 - All things that love the sun are out of doors : The sky rejoices in the morning's birth ; The grass is bright with rain-drops ; — on the moors The hare is running races in her mirth ; And with her feet she from the plashy earth Raises a mist; that, glittering in the sun, Runs with her all the way, wherever she doth run.
Página 351 - Seraph of Heaven ! too gentle to be human, Veiling beneath that radiant form of Woman All that is insupportable in thee Of light, and love, and immortality!
Página 64 - It is true, no age can restore a life, whereof, perhaps, there is no great loss; and revolutions of ages do not oft recover the loss of a rejected truth, for the want of which whole nations fare the worse.
Página 455 - Sincerity ! Thou first of virtues, let no mortal leave Thy onward path! although the earth should gape, And from the gulf of hell destruction cry To take dissimulation's winding way.
Página 236 - ... stairs rather directed to the use of the guest than to the eye of the artificer; and yet as the one chiefly heeded, so the other not neglected; each place handsome without curiosity, and homely without loathsomeness; not so dainty as not to be trod on, nor yet flubbered up with good fellowship; all more lasting than beautiful, but that the consideration of the exceeding lastingness made the eye believe it was exceeding beautiful.
Página 485 - Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night : It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden ; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be, Ere one can say — It lightens.
Página 465 - Mrs. Siddons, in her visit to me, behaved with great modesty and propriety, and left nothing behind her to be censured or despised. Neither praise nor money, the two powerful corrupters of mankind, seem to have depraved her.
Página 490 - Twixt my extremes and me this bloody •knife Shall play the umpire !" One of the most original effects of feeling and genius in the whole play occurred in the course of this scene ; but, unfortunately, it was not found susceptible of graphic delineation.

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