Lectures on Butler's Analogy of religion, to the constitution and course of nature, Volumen8

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Página 276 - For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices, which they offered year by year continually, make the comers thereunto perfect.
Página 276 - Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things, as Moses was admonished of God when he was about to make the tabernacle : for, See (saith he) that thou make all things according to the pattern showed to thee in the mount.
Página 72 - Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical ; because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence...
Página 278 - And every creature which is in heaven, and on the earth, and under the earth, and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, heard I saying ; Blessing and honour and glory and power be unto him that sitteth upon the throne and unto the Lamb for ever and ever.
Página 212 - A miracle is a violation of the laws of nature; and as a firm and unalterable experience has established these laws, the proof against a miracle, from the very nature of the fact, is as entire as any argument from experience can possibly be imagined.
Página 104 - ... though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered; and being made perfect, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him; called of God an high priest after the order of Melchisedec.
Página 208 - But the only distinct meaning of that word is stated, fixed, or settled; since what is natural as much requires and presupposes an intelligent agent to render it so, ie to effect it continually, or at stated times, as what is supernatural or miraculous does to effect it for once.
Página 223 - I had rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind; and, therefore, God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.
Página 276 - For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away sins.
Página 248 - Those who have handled sciences have been either men of experiment or men of dogmas. The men of experiment are like the ant ; they only collect and use : the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes a middle course ; it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own.

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