History of the Philosophy of Mind: Embracing the Opinions of All Writers on Mental Science from the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Volumen3

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Trelawney Wm. Saunders, 1848
 

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Página 502 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?
Página 119 - Clavis Universalis; or a new Inquiry after Truth: being a demonstration of the non-existence or impossibility of an external world.
Página 112 - Whether others have this wonderful faculty of abstracting their ideas, they best can tell ; for myself, I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them.
Página 442 - But besides all that endless variety of ideas or objects of knowledge, there is likewise Something which knows or perceives them; and exercises divers operations, as willing, imagining, remembering, about them. This perceiving, active being is what I call mind, spirit, soul, or myself; by which words I do not denote any one of my ideas, but a thing entirely distinct from them, wherein they exist, or, which is the same thing, whereby they are perceived; for the existence of an idea consists in being...
Página 430 - To instance in a particular part of a feature : the line that forms the ridge of the nose is beautiful when it is straight ; this then is the central form, which is oftener found than either concave, convex, or any other irregular form that shall be proposed.
Página 132 - One event follows another; but we never can observe any tie between them. They seem conjoined, but never connected. And as we can have no idea of any thing which never appeared to our outward sense or inward sentiment, the necessary conclusion seems to be, that we have no idea of connexion or power at all, and that these words are absolutely without any meaning, when employed either in philosophical reasonings or common life.
Página 283 - Custom settles habits of thinking in the understanding, as well as of determining in the will, and of motions in the body ; all which seems to be but trains of motion in the animal spirits, which once set a-going, continue in the same steps they have been used to ; which, by often treading, are worn into a smooth path, and the motion in it becomes easy, and as it were natural.
Página 514 - Gypsy life must have been in England during the latter part of the seventeenth, and the whole of the eighteenth century, which were likewise the happy days for Englishmen in general ; there was peace and plenty in the land, a contented population, and everything went well.
Página 473 - I may be allowed the expression — which connect us with, and link us to, those awful obscure realities — an all-powerful and equally beneficent God, and a world to come, beyond death and the grave. The first gives the nerve of combat while a ray of hope beams on the field ; the last pours the balm of comfort into the wounds which time can never cure.
Página 102 - It is, I think, agreed by all, that distance of itself, and immediately, cannot be seen. For distance being a line directed end-wise to the eye, it projects only one point in the fund of the eye. Which point remains invariably the same, whether the distance be longer or shorter.

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