A Manchester Book: The Song of the Cat, a Legend of the Chancery Court, Not Contained in Any of the Records, in Three Fits

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Simpkin, 1858 - 133 páginas
 

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Página 96 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade. Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill : But their strong nerves at last must yield ; They tame but one another still : Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath When they, pale captives,...
Página 96 - The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour: The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Página 92 - Nae cotillion brent new frae France, But hornpipes, jigs, strathspeys and reels, Put life and mettle in their heels. A winnock-bunker in the east, There sat auld Nick, in shape o...
Página 75 - Next crowne the bowle full With gentle lambs-wooll ; Adde sugar, nutmeg, and ginger, With store of ale too ; And thus ye must doe To make the wassaile a swinger.
Página 70 - O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill. Smit by her sacred frown, The fiend, Dissension, like a vapor sinks ; And e'en the all-dazzling crown Hides his faint rays, and at her bidding shrinks; Such was this heaven-loved isle, Than Lesbos fairer and the Cretan shore ! No more shall freedom smile ? Shall Britons languish, and be men no more ? Since all must life resign, Those sweet rewards which decorate the brave 'Tis folly to decline, And steal inglorious to the...
Página 96 - TWAS at the royal feast for Persia won By Philip's warlike son: Aloft in awful state The godlike hero sate On his imperial throne...
Página 70 - What constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Página 114 - No one venerates the peerage more than I do ; but, my lords, I must say that the peerage solicited me, — not I the peerage.
Página 98 - And they who, to be sure of Paradise, Dying put on the weeds of Dominic, Or in Franciscan think to pass disguised.
Página 70 - In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude, — Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain; These constitute a State; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.

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