An Introduction to Practical Astronomy: Volume 2: Containing Descriptions of the Various Instruments that Have Been Usefully Employed in Determining the Places of the Heavenly Bodies

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Cambridge University Press, 5 sept 2013 - 776 páginas
Although astronomical guides were available in the early nineteenth century, they tended to come from continental presses and were rarely in English. This two-volume work by the clergyman and astronomer William Pearson (1767-1847) aimed, with brilliant success, to compile data from extant sources into one of the first English practical guides to astronomy. Most of the tables were updated and improved versions, and some were wholly reconstructed to streamline the calculation processes. Sir John Herschel dubbed it 'one of the most important and extensive works on that subject which has ever issued from the press', and for his efforts Pearson was awarded the gold medal of the Astronomical Society. First published in 1829, Volume 2 provides full descriptions of a range of astronomical instruments, alongside instructions for their use and some pertinent equations and tables. In the history of science, Pearson's work reflects the contemporary challenges of celestial study.
 

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Índice

Circular Field of the Telescope
1
ON THE CORRECTION 1 Fundamental Star with an assumed Right Ascension
2
XLI DR BREWSTERS PA 1 Has two second moveable Objectglasses one entire and
3
DOLLONDS IMPROVED 1 Description 2 Remedy for a Defect 3 The Scale
4
ERECT EYEPIECES 1 Terrestrial Eyepiece 2 A Compound Microscope 3 Con
6
ROTATIVE DOME
9
XLIV ON THE USE OF PO 1 A Graduated Circle added 2 Remarks on the Use 3
10
LXXIV REPEATING CIRCLE 1 The Principle of Repetition first suggested by Mayer 2 Borda
11
ON THE PLUMBLINE 1 Its Use in adjusting an Axis to a vertical P0siti0n 2 When
285
ON ARTIFICIAL HORI LI 1 A Reflecting Plane gives a double Altitude 2 Horizontal
294
LIV ON THE PROPERTIES
310
LV A PORTABLE TRANSIT
317
TO DETERMINE
326
XLV EXPERIMENTAL COM 1 Three good Telescopes of different Focal Lengths chosen
332
LVIII ON THE ERRORS
337
THE MOSCOW TRANSIT I The Mechanism supported by Pillars 2 The Weight relieved
362

g xv
12
XCIX ON SOLAR ECLIPSES 1 The Circumstances attending a Solar Eclipse 2 The first
15
ON THE DIFFERENT 1 Definition of the Constant Angle 2 Four Methods of Deter
16
DIAGONAL EYEPIECES
21
A POPULAR EXPLANA l Achromatic Principle 2 So namedby Dr Bevis 3 Disper
30
STANDS FOR ACHROMA 1 Heavy Telescopes require Stands 2 Specimen of a plain
37
THE CONSTRUCTION AND 1 Method of determining the Magnifying Power by the Focal
46
SPIDERSLINE MICRO 1 Diflerent Micrometers 2 Spidersline Micrometer described
48
THE DORPAT REFRACT I Fraunhofers Chef daeuvre 2 The Framework 3
55
xvr HERSCHELIAN ETELE
79
XVIII AN HISTORICAL
89
OTHER METHODS
110
XXL MICROMETRICAL SCALE
120
A NEW POLYMETRIC
130
XXXIV RAMSDENS CATOP 1 Principle of Reflection proposed 2 Its advantage 3
194
ZENITH SECTOR BY 1 Has a descending Axis and is more portable than its Prede
212
XXIII
224
1221
228
steeds Sector and mural Arch 19 Grahams mural Qua
268
ON THE METHODS OF 1 All Transitinstruments used in the same manner 2 Method
371
63? 71
378
AN ALPHABETICAL This List contains six Columns 1 The Places 2 The
383
RAMSDENS ALTITUDE l The Palermo Instrument 2 The vertical Axis has Metallic
422
LXVII THE WESTBURY AL 1 Circles for Count Bruhl and Mr Pond 2 The Vertical Axis
444
LXX ON THE USES OF A l The Portable Instrument has Verniers instead of Reading
457
NEW REPEATING CIR 1 Both the Altitude and the Azimuth Circles repeat separately
509
REPEATING TRIPOD l Will convert a portable Theodolite into a Repeating horizontal
515
EQUATORIAL IN l A Polar Axis used by Scheiner in 1620 2 Shorts reflecting
524
LXXXIL ZENITH MICROME 1 Is of recent invention the Greenwich Instrument the first 2
549
POLAR INSTRU l Described as a fixed Instrument revolving round the Polar
558
Reflector at the Object End of a Telescope
569
LXXXIX TROUGHTONS RE The Authors Reasons for preferring a Circle without the
596
2123
657
LXXL A NEW PORTABLE AL I The Plan original 2 Stand and Circles described 3
665
TO DETERMINE THE l The Angle at the Equinox variable 2 An Example for de
702
2326
703
CONCLUSION I The rapid Improvements in Practical Astronomy 2 Owing
707
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