An Appeal on the Subject of the Accumulation of Wealth: Addressed to the Society of Friends, Usually Called Quakers, Individually and Collectively

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J. Darling, 1824 - 40 páginas
 

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Página 11 - And crowds with crimes the records of mankind; For gold his sword the hireling ruffian draws, For gold the hireling judge distorts the laws; Wealth heap'd on wealth, nor truth nor safety buys, The dangers gather as the treasures rise.
Página 10 - I CANNOT call riches better than the baggage of virtue ; the Roman word is better, " impedimenta ;" for as the baggage is to an army, so is riches to virtue ; it cannot be spared nor left behind, but it hindereth the march ; yea, and the care of it sometimes loseth or disturbeth the vietory ; of great riches there is no real use, except it be in the distribution ; the rest is but conceit...
Página 12 - And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.
Página 13 - Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue ; for I am tormented in this flame. " But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime received thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things : but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.
Página 10 - I CANNOT call Riches better than the baggage of virtue. The Roman word is better, im-pedimenta. For as the baggage is to an army, so is riches to virtue. It cannot be spared nor left behind, but it hindereth the march; yea and the care of it sometimes loseth or disturbeth the victory. Of great riches there is no real use, except it be in the distribution; the rest is but conceit. So saith Solomon, ' Where much is, there are many to consume it; and what hath the owner but the sight of it with his...
Página 12 - He also that received seed among the thorns is he that heareth the word ; and the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, choke the word, and he becometh unfruitful.
Página 17 - Those, who profess it, consider themselves bound to regulate their opinions, words, actions, and even outward demeanour, by christianity, and by christianity alone. They consider themselves bound to give up such of the customs, or fashions of men, however general, or generally approved, as militate, in any manner, against the letter or the spirit of the gospel.
Página 17 - Quakerism may be defined to be an attempt, under the divine influence, at practical christianity as far as it can be carried. Those, who profess it, consider themselves bound to regulate their opinions, words, actions, and even outward demeanour, by christianity, and by christianity alone. They consider themselves bound to give up such of the customs, or fashions of men, however general, or generally approved, as militate...
Página 9 - Be plain in clothes, furniture, and food, but clean, and then the coarser the better ; the rest is folly and a snare. Therefore, next to sin, avoid daintiness and choiceness about your persons and houses. For if it be not an evil in itself, it is a temptation to it ; and may be accounted a nest for sin to brood in.

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