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Strange war! where both, as vanquish'd, are content,
And both, as conq'ring, their success lament.

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ON MRS. POPE AND MISS FELLOWES, BEAUTIES

AT BATH, SOME YEARS AGO.

BY THE SAME,

IN Mrs. Pope, I grant, more charms we find,
Than are in all her sex besides combin'd:
But though she thus excels each other toast,
Yet of her Fellowes Bath may justly boast.

ON TWO NEIGHBOURS, WHO DIED AT THE

SAME TIME.

BY THE LATE DR. JAMES FORDYCE *.

“ MY neighbour Thornton cannot live a day,"
Cried honest Jones, then in a deep decay.

Jones cannot live a day,” cried Thornton, broke
With cruel gout, tho' ftill he lov'd a joke.
To think himself might die, each one was loth:
Before the day expird-Death seized them both.

* Dr. J. Fordyce died, at Bath, Oct. 1, 1796, in the 76th year of his age. His death is poetically lamented by Mrs. Hannah Moore, in The Gentleman's Magazine for November, 1796.

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FAIR sculpture of Ammon's young graces !

My Lady with whim Thall we tax, On Paper who marks thy faint traces,

Which Stella stamps lively in wax?

Of their hearts they make mutual confession,

That, cold to emotions once felt,
The mother's scarce yields to impression,

The daughter's can foften and melt.

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Author of The Tears of Old May Day, first printed in The World, Of Lovibond's -Life few particulars are known. His Works are included in Dr, Anderson's Edition of the British Poets.

EPIGRAM.

BY THE REV. RICHARD GRAVES *.

MEAGRE NEATNESS.

THUS to the master of a house, Which, like a church, would starve a moule, Which never guest had entertain'd, Nor meat, nor wine its floors had stain'd; I said :--" Well, Sir, 'tis vastly fine; “ But where d'you drink, and where d'you dine? “ If one may judge by rooms so neat, “ It costs.you more in mops than meat."

THE FAIR STOIC.

BY THE SAME.

BEAR and forbear;" thus preach the Stoic fages ; And in two words include the sense of

pages. “ With patience bear life's certain ills; and oh! Forbear those pleasures that must end in woe.”

* Rector of Claverton, near Bath.

With these wise maxims Sappho still can treat us,
And prove her text from Carter's Epictetus.
Thus to be Stoics each fair friend she teaches,
Whilft Sappho ne'er will practise what the preaches;
For, turn'd of fifty, we may safely swear,
Sappho will neither bear, nor yet forbear,

TO BE WRITTEN IN A LADY’S MILTON.

BY THE SAME.

CLOE, to Cloe's foibles somewhat blind,
Admires the wild caprice of womankind.
“ Strange that our mother Eve, so void of grace,
“ Should for an apple curse the human race !"
Her censure thus on Eve rash Cloe pours,
Whilft she herself green fruit and chalk devours.
But cease, fair maid, that fatal crime to blame,
When

you, more frail, had surely done the same : For less restraint, your Maker's will had crost, Nay, for a crab, your Paradise had lost.

THE FORCE OF FASHION.

BY THE SAME.

VARUS, tho' merely led by fashion,
For worth alone pretends a passion;
Affects with truly lib'ral spirit,
To idolize a man of merit:
Applauds the deeds, the sense, the jokes
Of good, of wise, of witty folks :-
He daily at your house attends,
And seems to rank you with his friends :
In public too he'll still affect
To treat you with profound respect,
(More than Venetians do their doge)
For what?-Because you are in vogue.

But, Sir, you must not think it strange
If Varus should his conduct change.
The public, fickle as a child,
Now frowns on what so late it smild;
Still fond of change, wants something new;
Caressing me, neglecting you.

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