Personal Sketches of His Own Times, Volumen1

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Página 247 - The glorious, pious, and immortal memory of the great and good King William, — not forgetting Oliver Cromwell who assisted in redeeming us from Popery, slavery, arbitrary power, brass money, and wooden shoes.
Página 339 - A cause was argued in Chancery, wherein the plaintiff prayed that the defendant should be restrained from suing him on certain bills of exchange, as they were nothing but kites. — " Kites ?" exclaimed Lord Redesdale :— " Kites, Mr. Plunkett ? Kites never could amount to the value of those securities ! I don't understand this statement at all, Mr. Plunkett." " It is not to be expected that you should, my Lord," answered Plunkett : " In England and in Ireland, kites are quite different things.
Página 311 - Half liked, half reprobated, he was too high to be despised, and too low to be respected. His language was coarse, and his principles arbitrary ; but his passions were his slaves, and his cunning was his instrument. In public and in private he was the same character ; and, though a most fortunate man and a successful courtier, he had scarcely a sincere friend or a disinterested adherent".
Página 81 - ... of potatoes roasted on the turf ashes ; — in addition to which, ale, whiskey, and port made up the refreshments. All being duly in order, we at length awakened Joe Kelly, and Peter Alley, his neighbour : they had slept soundly, though with no other pillow than the wall ; and my brother announced breakfast with a view holloa...
Página 204 - ... repeated the suggestion literatim. Sir Frederick was once making a long speech in the Irish parliament, lauding the transcendent merits of the Wexford magistracy, on a motion for extending the criminal jurisdiction in that county, to keep down the disaffected. As he was closing a most turgid oration, by declaring " that the said magistracy ought to receive some signal mark of the Lord Lieutenant's favour," — John Egan, who was rather mellow, and sitting behind him, jocularly whispered, " and...
Página 336 - Lord Redesdale was much (though unintentionally) annoyed by Mr. Toler, at one of the first dinners he gave (as Lord Chancellor of Ireland) to the judges and King's counsel. Having heard that the members of the Irish bar (of whom he was then quite ignorant,) were considered extremely witty, and being desirous, if possible, to adapt himself to their habits, his Lordship ha'd obviously got together some of his best...
Página 68 - I of nearly ten minutes' duration; to 'which melody tally ho! was responded by every stentorian voice. A fox's brush stuck into a candlestick, in the centre of the table, was worshipped as a divinity ! Claret flowed — bumpers were multiplied — and chickens, in the garb of spicy spitchcocks, assumed the name of devils to whet the appetites which it was impossible to conquer ! My reason gradually began to lighten me of its burden, and in its last efforts kindly suggested the straw-chamber as my...
Página 270 - Wexford, who unaccountably escaped ; and a gentleman of the bar whose name I shall not mention, as he still lives. The entertainment was good, and the party cheerful. Temple freaks were talked over ; the bottle circulated : but, at length, Irish politics became the topic, and proceeded to an extent of disclosure which utterly surprised me. With the Messrs. Sheers (particularly Henry) I had always been on terms of the greatest intimacy : I had extricated both of them not long before from considerable...
Página 192 - Opposition parties were totally laid aside ; harmony, wit, wine, and good humour reigning triumphant. The Speaker, Clerk, Chancellor of the Exchequer, and a very few veteran financiers, remained in the House till the necessary routine was gone through, and then joined their happy comrades, the party seldom breaking up till midnight. On the ensuing day the same festivities were repeated ; but on the third day, when the report was to be brought in, and the business discussed in detail, ^the scene totally...
Página 198 - One compartment of seats in the House was covered with scarlet cloth, and appropriated to the Peeresses .and their daughters, who ranged themselves according to the table of precedence. "The Commons, their families and friends, lined the galleries: the whole House was superbly carpeted, and the Speaker's chair newly adorned for the Lord Chancellor. On the whole, it was by far the most impressive and majestic spectacle ever exhibited within those walls. " At length the Peers entered, according to...

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