Trips in Time: Time Travel Tales by Roger Zelazny, Poul Anderson, Christopher Priest, and More!

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Wildside Press, 2009 - Fiction - 162 pages
3 Reviews
Included in this volume are "An Infinite Summer," by Christopher Priest; "The King's Wishes," by Robert Sheckley; "Manna," by Peter Phillips; "The Long Remembering," by Poul Anderson; "Try and Change the Past," by Fritz Leiber; "Divine Madness, by Roger Zelazny; "Mugwump 4," by Robert Silverberg; "Secret Rider," by Marta Randall; and "The Seesaw," by A.E. van Vogt.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Anthologies are always a mixed bag, but this had more successes than most, and some were wonderful. Some poignant, some humorous, some odd. Seems to be possibly aimed at YA, but certainly enjoyable ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Chris177 - LibraryThing

This book contains 9 time travel short stories written by some leading science fiction authors including Poul Anderson and A.E. van Vogt. Each story is very different from the others. Some of the ... Read full review

About the author (2009)

Christopher Priest is the author of ten novels and two collections of short stories, including the prize-winning THE GLAMOUR and THE PRESTIGE which won the James Tait Black award in 1995. He lives in Hastings with his wife and twin children.

Philip Wylie (1902-71) is the author of "Gladiator" and the coauthor of "When Worlds Collide," both available in Bison Books editions. Acclaimed science-fiction writer Robert Silverberg is the recipient of many awards, including the prestigious Hugo and Nebula awards, and the Grand Master designation from the Science Fiction Writers of America, the highest science-fiction honor available. He is the author of "Lord Valentine's Castle,

Poul Anderson, November 25, 1926 - July 31, 2001 Poul Anderson was born on November 25, 1926 in Bristol, Pennsylvania to parents Anton and Astrid. After his father's death, Poul's mother took them first to Denmark and then to Maryland and Minnesota. He earned his degree in Physics from the University of Minnesota, but chose instead to write stories for science fiction magazines, such as "Astounding." Anderson is considered a "hard science fiction" writer, meaning that his books have a basis in scientific fact. To attain this high level of scientific realism, Anderson spent many hours researching his topics with scientists and professors. He liked to write about individual liberty and free will, which was a well known theme in many of his books. He also liked to incorporate his love of Norse mythology into his stories, sometimes causing his modern day characters to find themselves in fantastical worlds, such as in "Three Hearts and Three Lions," published in 1961. Anderson has written over a hundred books, his last novel, "Genesis" won the John W. Campbell Award, one of the three major science fiction awards. He is a former president of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and won three Nebula awards and nine Hugo Awards. In 1997, Anderson was named a Grandmaster by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and was also inducted into the Science Fiction Fantasy Hall of Fame. Poul Anderson died on July 31, 2001 at the age of 74.

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