The World Book: Organized Knowledge in Story and Picture, Volumen3

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Michael Vincent O'Shea, Ellsworth D. Foster, George Herbert Locke
Hanson-Roach-Fowler Company, 1918
 

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Página 2070 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
Página 2096 - THIS is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks, Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight, Stand like Druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic, Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
Página 2183 - Hats off! Along the street there comes A blare of bugles , a ruffle of drums; And loyal hearts are beating high: Hats off ! The flag is passing by!
Página 2055 - UNDER the wide and starry sky, Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be ; Home is the sailor, home from sea, And the hunter home from the hill.
Página 2070 - ... is good for the stone and reins, shooting for the lungs and breast, gentle walking for the stomach, riding for the head and the like ; .so if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics ; for in demonstrations, if his wit bo called away never so little, he must begin again...
Página 2053 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Página 2013 - Tell them, dear, that if eyes were made for seeing. Then Beauty is its own excuse for being: Why thou wert there, O rival of the rose!
Página 1718 - I have no pleasure in them ; while the sun, or the light, or the moon, or the stars, be not darkened, nor the clouds return after the rain : in the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease, because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened...
Página 2052 - tis terrible no way — for consider, brother Toby, — when we are — death is not; — and when death is — we are not.
Página 2069 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring ; for ornament, is in discourse ; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one ; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best from those that are learned.

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